Marijuana joint in Mexican Congress to remember decriminalization agenda

The proposal includes the right to carry up to 30 grams of cannabis per person, the authorization to consume marijuana on public roads, as well as the planting, cultivation, harvesting, preparation, manufacturing, production, distribution and sale of this drug.

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Mexico, Oct (SF) .- A deputy without a party from Mexico reminded her of the pending agenda on the legalization of marijuana use to the Secretary of the Interior of that country, Olga Sánchez Cordero, handing her a pot of marijuana in the Chamber of Deputies.


Sánchez Cordero had appeared before the Lower House on Wednesday to talk about immigration policy, human rights and the security and justice plan of President Andrés Manuel López Obrador.

But in the midst of some questions and recognition of his work, the deputy without a party, Ana Lucía Riojas, handed him the joint.

“One step to build peace is to legalize the use of drugs, a proposal that you made (…) I bring a gift as a reminder of that proposal,” deputy Riojas told Sánchez Cordero, while he approached a joint of marijuana.

“Thank you very much, “said Secretary Sánchez Cordero, who showed the marijuana joint to the Chamber’s gallery.


On November 8, Sánchez Cordero, then senator of the Morena ruling party, presented an initiative to create the General Law for the Regulation and Control of Cannabis, which sought to regulate the use of marijuana for personal, scientific and commercial purposes.

The proposal includes the right to carry up to 30 grams of cannabis per person, the cultivation of up to 20 plants of this species per person for self-consumption, the authorization to consume marijuana on public roads, as well as planting, cultivation, harvesting, preparation, manufacture, production, distribution and sale of this drug.

With the presented model of strict legal regulation, Sánchez Cordero explained that he sought to rethink drug policy in a country with more than 240,000 dead and 40,000 missing in 10 years, in the framework of the war on drug trafficking.

In 10 months of government, López Obrador has decreed the end of the “war on drug trafficking” – declared by former President Felipe Calderón, in December 2006 – with the aim of carrying out a different route to reduce insecurity, which supposedly it would not be limited to the arrest of leaders of these criminal organizations.

A few weeks ago, the Mexican president declared that he planned to convene a consultation on the legalization of some drugs, as part of the chain to ensure safety.

“Especially what has to do with curative drugs or for medical care,” said the president.

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